PRINT

Print can add great value to design through a thorough knowledge of paper, inks and the printing process. It’s a dying art and one that we are at pains to preserve, through our relationships with paper makers, printers and people who appreciate these skills…

Turners Card Crop - Coat of Arms Crop

Worshipful Company of Turners Logo Close Up

Worshipful Company of Turners printed at Baddley Brothers

Worshipful Company of Turners printed at Badly Brothers - Die Stamp Ink

Worshipful Company of Turners printed at Badly Brothers - Die Stamp

PRINT

Print can add great value to design through a thorough knowledge of paper, inks and the printing process. It’s a dying art and one that we are at pains to preserve, through our relationships with paper makers, printers and people who appreciate these skills…

THE WORSHIPFUL COMPANY OF TURNERS

The Worshipful Company of Turners is home to the country’s finest craftsmen working with wood. When they asked us to look at their identity we knew this would be a project that would benefit from close attention to print production.

Their identity began life in 1634 as a simple coat of arms. Over the years it had grown complicated and at odds with the beautifully considered craft it celebrated. We came in to refocus and de-clutter. Taking a fresh look at the assets at our disposal and reinstating the clarity and confidence befitting an ancient guild of London.

We created one definitive coat of arms and locked it up with one definitive logotype to create a strong base for a proud identity. For the crest we refined elements from the three previous crests for a cleaner finish; the logotype ‘turns’ around the crest as a spinning lathe would do. It works for the two sides of the company – both the historic guild and the craft of turning, and will last well into the future.

With the identity done, it was time to put our craftsmanship to the test, giving the new look the print finish it deserved. We started by commissioning a new die stamp (the original being lost many years ago) to ensure sharp definition every time. Die cutting is a traditional technique whose quality is yet to be bettered by modern methods, so it felt fitting to include this element into the identity of such a well-established guild.

Simple and strong, the identity can only be used in a set number of ways, but still has all the flexibility it needs to work across all scales of printed materials from business cards to banners. Every printed element has been minutely considered and nods to England’s rich print heritage. The typefaces are a case in point: Caslon dating back to the time of the company’s inception, Gill Sans a modern classic, and both created in London. The Colourplan paper is made by an English family firm and each piece is printed in East London.

Throughout each stage of the project we looked to enhance the finished print quality. And it means two ancient crafts – turning and printing – are showcased to perfection here.

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